Translations

Someone stated that we need to stop reading into the Greek and Hebrew and just accept the “bible” as is. What a lazy Christian!

The problem is that biases are entered into translations. This is proven over and over in every translation. There is no “666” in the plain text, but you wouldn’t know that unless you go to the Greek. The most significant mistranslation isn’t the χξς though, but Sabbaton – meaning Sabbath. In 363–364 AD, at the request of Constantine, the Council of Laodicea (how apropos) met and codified many of the Christian beliefs without using the word of God. This is the birth of the Catholic church. They agreed upon 60 cannons and published them. Here are three of note:

Canon 29

Christians must not judaize by resting on the Sabbath, but must work on that day, rather honouring the Lord’s Day; and, if they can, resting then as Christians. But if any shall be found to be judaizers, let them be anathema [cursed] from Christ.

Canon 37

It is not lawful to receive portions sent from the feasts of Jews or heretics, nor to feast together with them.

Canon 38

It is not lawful to receive unleavened bread from the Jews, nor to be partakers of their impiety.

http://www.newadvent.org/fathers/3806.htm

In other words, they changed the scriptures to excise the “church” from the Jews and implemented the Lord’s day as Sunday instead of Saturday. When the Reformation came, the Protestants were already well-established in tradition over the word of God. Therefore, if you, if you want to know the truth, must go back to the Greek and Hebrew to setting a lot of traditions. Until the Geneva bible (1587) and the King James bible (1611) (both after the Reformation and more Catholic than previous versions) Matthew 28 read “first Sabbath”, not “first day of the week”.  Like most American who had never read the Constitution and know their rights, those that do not do their own homework are liable to get the answers wrong when the Teacher comes to grade us.

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